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Proceedings of the International Plant Propagator's Society

Vol. 30

Title:
PROPAGATION OF AVOCADOS IN SUB-TROPICAL COASTAL REGIONS OF QUEENSLAND AND NEW SOUTH WALES

Author:
John V. Pohlman

pp: 624

Abstract:
The avocado (Persea americana Mill.), family Lauraceae, is a native of Central America and the West Indies. The avocado industry commenced in America about 1910. Prior to this it was only known as backyard fruit. There are records in Queensland of two trees being planted at Buderim Mountain in 1908. Both trees bore fruit. A few Queensland growers planted trees around 1920 and attempted to market the fruit. I say attempted, because fruit had to be given away to get people to eat them. These early plantings consisted of seedling trees and were established in North Queensland and in the coastal regions of South Queensland.

There are three horticultural races of avocados, namely Mexican, Guatemalan, and west Indian. There are also hybrids derived from crosses between these races.

Avocado trees can be propagated either by seed or vegetatively by grafting, budding, cuttings or marcottage. The avocado, in common with many other species of plants, is cross pollinated and seedlings rarely, if

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