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Proceedings of the International Plant Propagator's Society

Vol. 29

Title:
THE IMPORTANCE OF THE ENVIRONMENT IN GROWING AFRICAN VIOLETS

Author:
Robert Kasteel

pp: 582-585

Abstract:
African violets are one of the most specialized of ornamental crops. They are easily propagated from seed or leaf cuttings. Fully matured leaves from the outside of flower stalks are preferred for propagation. Adventitious buds are rapidly formed and develop into plantlets.

African violets are not a difficult crop to grow if you understand them and their conditions. The important environmental considerations are as follows:

Light. The emphasis is on light intensity rather than day-length. The optimum solar radiant flux density is 1100 ft. candles. Extensive yellowing occurs in the foliage of African violets which are exposed to radiant energy levels above 1200 ft. candles. This is due to chlorophyll destruction by the radiant energy. Light intensity above 1100 ft. candles reduces the number of flowers per plant in some cultivars. More commonly, the initiation of flowers by African violets is seriously limited at radiant flux densities below 300 ft. candles. A radiant flux of 100 ft.

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