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  Eur.J.Hortic.Sci. 2014/3

Biosecurity and Emerging Plant Health Problems in Turf Production and Maintenance

Authors

K. Entwistle1) ; T. Fleming2) ; R. Kerr2) ; A. Maule2) ; T. Martin2, 3) ; M. Hainon-McDowell3) ; C. C. Fleming2, 3)
1)The Turf Disease Centre, Waverley Cottage, Sherfield Road, Bramley, Hampshire RG26 5AG, United Kingdom; 2)Molecular Bioscience-Parasitology, Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, BT7 1NN, United Kingdom; 3)Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast, BT9 5PX, United Kingdom

Summary

Recent research has supported the view that the distributions of many pests and diseases have extended towardshigher latitudes over the last 50 years. Probably drivenby a combination of climate change and trade, this extensionto the ranges of hundreds of plant pathogens may have serious implications not only for agriculture, horticultureand forestry, but also for turf production &maintenance. Here we review our data relating to thecurrent status of three emerging pest and disease problemsacross North West Europe (rapid blight, Labyrinthula sp. , the root knot nematode, Meloidogyne minor and the pacific stem gall nematode, Anguina pacificae ) and discuss the factors which may be involved in theirspread and increasing impact on the turf industry. With turf production and maintenance becoming an increasinglyinternational business, we ask if biosecurity and the promotion of plant health in turf production fields and associated sport facilities should be a greater priorityfor the industry. We also examine if a lack of effectivebiosecurity measures in the materials supply chain has led to increased plant health problems.

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Keywords

Anguina ; Labyrinthula ; Meloidogyne ; nematodes; pathogens; plant disease; quarantine

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